WOULD YOU BUY A TATTOOED FISH?

Photo courtesy of Squish_E

The practice of tattooing fish began in 2005 using dye techniques that would eventually fade. Since 2005, tattooing techniques have evolved to allow popular phrases, hearts and even rainbows to be permanently tattooed on fish.

The lucky species of fish that is most commonly used, is the tropical parrotfish. This is because they are relatively large and have a high survival rate after tattooing. Since tattooing techniques have improved, the practice is spreading to other smaller, less hardy species such as goldfish.

Tattooed fish have become very popular in China and Vietnam because they are believed to bring good luck. For example, one of the popular tattooed phrases in China reads, “May your business boom” in English. They are now commonly sold in the USA for the pet trade, but also to businesses who wish to write a nice message to their customers using this dynamic sketchpad.

Fish without tattoos can cost around £1.00, whereas tattooed fish, fetch around £2.50. As a relatively cheap technique done en masse, tattooed fish can provide a good return on investments made by pet shop owners. Designs are tattooed on the fish by either using dyes inserted via injection (taking up to half a year to develop) or by low intensity lasers. Distributors of tattooed fish claim that no harm comes to any of the fish during tattooing.

However, tattooed fish have a low survival rate, hence the stronger parrotfish being the most popular choice for vendors. In addition to this, lasers and injections damage a protective surface layer on the fish, leaving them prone to infections. There have also been instances of viruses spreading in populations of tattooed fish due to the unhygienic use of needles.

Legislative bodies are still deliberating whether this unnecessarily cruel practice should be made illegal or not. Raising the awareness of the general public will hopefully decrease this practice in western cultures. Surely most people would agree, these fish are naturally beautiful and do not need potentially harmful designs to make them appealing.

Haley Dolton